anthropocentric ethics

Anthropocentric Ethics – In Ancient & Modern Perspective The author/composer/poet/community which produced the text we know of as Genesis 1 observed many things. Just one of these is the uniqueness of humans in relation to our environment. Day and night, earth and sky, sea and land, vegetation, and fruits, creatures great and tiny, both in… Continue reading anthropocentric ethics

flew’s brain still works

{***EDIT: The review discussed below – allegedly by Antony Flew of ‘The God Delusion’ by Richard Dawkins – is of uncertain origins.  I’m awaiting an email response to clarify the source.  Discerning how much Flew’s age is affecting his critical thinking is a difficult thing.  Poor memory doesn’t – automatically – mean poor logical thought. … Continue reading flew’s brain still works

pain bears a message

This post over at ‘Just Thomism‘ is short, sweet and very thought-provoking. I’m thankful for pain. Not generally at the moment I experience it, but when I think about it, yes I’m glad (for example) that my body tells me when I’m burning my hand on the stove-top. It’s a painful message that my body… Continue reading pain bears a message

gould: science a natural venture

Here Gould threatens a ‘knuckle-rapping’ to both theists and atheists who would try to use science (in general) or the theory of evolution by natural selection (in particular) to butress their worldview. People familiar with Gould will detect the scent of N.O.M.A. (Nonoverlapping Magesteria – don’t ask me why it’s not N.M. or N.O.M.) in… Continue reading gould: science a natural venture

is anything significant?

This question (‘Is anything significant?’) can be fleshed out a bit… We could ask, “Is everything equally in-significant?”, or we could ask, “Is everything equally highly-significant?” What makes something (an event or object [which can quite rightly be said to be ‘events’ in themselves]) significant, and another thing not so?