random choice

Scenario 1: After instructing a person to make a random choice between two options in front of her, a computer detects brain activity in a human subject before she clicks the button to communicate her choice.  The experiment conductor, upon repeats of the same experiment, can predict her choice seconds before she is aware of… Continue reading random choice

miracle

Some uses/senses of the word ‘miracle’: Something happened:  Literally anything ‘happening’ – any phenomena as opposed to a non-phenomenological non-existence (existence is action – matter doesn’t just exist, it happens).  This can be called miraculous in the sense of ‘everything is a miracle’ or ‘look around – miracles are all around you’.  This concept, in… Continue reading miracle

purposeful chance

Succinct and razor sharp as always, James Chastek discusses how so-called ‘blind chance’ events can be used for a purpose – giving two excellent illustrations (coin-toss and cement mixing). This (for me) completely takes the wind out of the Dawkins-like assurance that big, bad ‘chance’ is an enemy of design and/or God ((and it probably… Continue reading purposeful chance

had to be chance?

chance & necessity | random & planned | chaos & order | freedom & determinism The phrase ‘by chance’ refers to an event/result happening without compulsion or determination – we say the situation/result ‘did not have to be that way’. The phrase ‘of necessity’ refers to an event/result happening according to compulsion or law –… Continue reading had to be chance?

making sense of sheldrake

[copied from excerpt from YouTube video (embedded below) of a talk given by Rupert Sheldrake at ‘Google Tech Talks’ on September 2, 2008 entitled “The Extended Mind: Recent Experimental Evidence”] Rupert Sheldrake, Ph.D. is a biologist and author of more than 75 technical papers and ten books, the most recent being The Sense of Being… Continue reading making sense of sheldrake

is anything significant?

This question (‘Is anything significant?’) can be fleshed out a bit… We could ask, “Is everything equally in-significant?”, or we could ask, “Is everything equally highly-significant?” What makes something (an event or object [which can quite rightly be said to be ‘events’ in themselves]) significant, and another thing not so?