postflow

I incessantly think and type in footnotese. ((this is probably just being lazy))  I constantly use parentheses ((and hyphens)) to put thoughts within thoughts within thoughts.

Thanks to a funky plugin ((http://elvery.net/drzax/wordpress-footnotes-plugin)), I can now make my nuances and additions viewable by hovering or clicking on the footnote number ((that’s it!!!)) – all without breaking the flow of thought. ((sort of – except for when you pause to read the footnote, etc.??))

contingency

To completely tell the story of something, you have to talk about something other than the thing itself.

To completely tell the story of a sub-atomic particle, you have to talk about the atom.

To completely tell the story of a living cell, you have to talk about the cellular organism it is a part of.

To completely tell the story of a tree, you have to talk about rain, soil, wind, sunlight, etc.

To completely tell the story of a human, you have to talk about their parents.

To completely tell the story of a website, you have to talk about the internet.

To completely tell the story of the scientific method, you have to talk about regularity and the desire to know.

To completely tell the story of the earth, you have to talk about (presumably) the sun.

To completely tell the story of the sun (and our solar system), you have to talk about the milky-way galaxy.

To completely tell the story of our galaxy, you halve to talk about the universe.

To completely tell the story of our universe, you have to talk about something other than our universe.

on publishing words

technology has changed the way we use words…

if we restrict a quick analysis to the major modes of communication used now (we could include ancient writing, but will not at the moment), we could make some brief observations about the different kinds…

  • journals, encyclopedias and textbooks – characterised by their scholarship, which (lest we forget) is basically interaction with the thought of others.
  • published book (with proper publisher) – a sustained statement (or argument or story), which was likely researched, drafted, revised etc.
  • magazine article (decently respected mag) – a shortened version of a larger argument or conversation – again, research and refinement, etc.
  • newspaper article – an even more condensed piece, yet still some research and refinement needed.
  • website or professional blog – considered statements for whatever purpose – the more refinement the better, etc.
  • personal blog – more off-the-cuff thoughts – “research” = (often) googling
  • Facebook status update – 99.3% of the time, time-wasting, boredom-prolonging nonsense (i.e. i had “this” for dinner, etc.)
  • twitter updates – humanity has gone too far :)  nobody needs to know what you are up to that often

gears

For mozzila firefox users, who blog with wordpress…

…I recommend installing the ‘Google Gears‘ plug-in (click ‘Turbo’ in your WordPress dashboard – sorry not available for wordpress.com users!), which (when enabled) stores all the little images and things that you otherwise have to download each time you change pages.  This not only saves bandwith, but should considerably speed up your ‘dashboard time’ (even if you have a pretty fast internet connection?).

While I’m at it, I also recommend the AdBlock Plus (blocks many/most advertisements) plug-in and the Zotero (bibliography/referencing tool) plug-in.

Wright comments on blogging

“It really is high time we developed a Christian ethic of blogging. Bad temper is bad temper even in the apparent privacy of your own hard drive, and harsh and unjust words, when released into the wild, rampage around and do real damage. And as for the practice of saying mean an unjust things behind a pseudonym – well if I get a letter like that it goes straight in the bin. But the cyberspace equivalents of road rage don’t happen by accident. People who type vicious, angry, slanderous and inaccurate accusations do so because they feel their worldview to be under attack.” (Wright, N.T., Justification: God’s Plan, Paul’s Vision,SPCK, 2009, p.10)

Found here.  Hat-tip Ben Myers.