immoral eating?

I saw some footage tonight from a hot-dog eating contest

Disgusting…

Utterly disgusting…

Yet somewhat amusing…

But later I thought…

“Hey, isn’t that shocking? All these people cramming down (and I don’t know how long they stayed ‘down’…) dozens of hot-dogs each, while food is scarce for most/many in the world!!??”

Is this utterly immoral?

Am I too idealistic?

Now, I do think that we are capable of growing plenty of food for all to have enough to eat – heck even enough for us to have a bit of fun with our food. But these kinds of clashing realities (or to use a phrase from NZ Baptist Assembly last year – ‘colliding worlds’) just seem to jump out at me more and more…

6 thoughts on “immoral eating?”

  1. It’s a reality that we selfishly waste resources while others suffer due to shortages. But you could spend all day in a state of guilt – so far today I’ve wasted some of my breakfast that I binned, I’ve used loads of luxury items such as my tele, computer, washing machine etc when I could easily go without these and donate the money to those with real needs, I’ve also spent money on taking my kids to swimming lessons when other kids in the world can’t even afford books to learn let alone do extracurricular stuff, and I drove to town burning up fuel to buy bread in a plastic bag – just this morning I’ve not only hurt people but I’ve played my part in needlessly destroying the environment too. I guess Dawkins would understand – blame the selfish gene, don’t think Christ would be so impressed tho!

  2. Haha! That’s probably not fair to Dawkins, (and I’m sure you’re obviously teasing)…
    But yes, thankfully, there’s a quite key middle ground between mindless (not to mention careless) consumption and constant guilt…
    :)
    -d-

  3. This probably jumps out because you are directly seeing the food go to waste. I wonder how many hotdogs you could buy with the fuel used to power a Formula 1 car just once around a circuit?

    In fact, when you measure it that way, hotdog gobbling is probably one of the least wasteful sports resource-wise.

  4. Cheers Damian,
    Yeah, I reckon you’ve got a point. The ‘directness’ makes it seem all the more wasteful; i.e. food excess compared ‘directly’ with food shortage.
    But yes, your fuel example is good. I had a similar feeling about various upgrades to various places around Auckland – which I hadn’t noticed as being that bad. For example, I don’t even wanna know how much was spent on labour and materials for the fancy marble, etc. upgrades to queen street (even though it’s nicer to walk on now, etc.)…
    Of course, things are more complicated than that. But still, greed is a very real and destructive reality.

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